4 September 2015

Student Complaining Easier, New practical maths course, Google logo changed…

Less drop outs since rise in tuition fees

Coin hoard next to piggy bank The number of students dropping out of university has decreased 16% since tuition fees were increased from £1k to £3k a year, according to a report from the Lancaster University Management School.

Their research showed that first year students were less likely to drop out since the fees were trebled in 2006, and have suggested that students thought more carefully about whether uni was right for them before applying as they would leave with more debt. Today’s students would kill for £3k a year fees!

Our take: It’s too soon, really, to see if the trend has continued since tuition fees were trebled (…again, in 2012). Whilst it will obviously be great if more students stick it out at uni, students shouldn’t feel forced to continue their degree when it simply isn’t right for them. First year students are more likely to drop out thanks to things such as homesickness. Check out our guides to help you feel more prepared when you start uni (and how to survive living with flatmates).

More students to have access to complaints ombudsman

complaint   Uni students have been able to complain to the independent ombudsman Office of the Independent Adjudicator (OIA) for quite a few years now, but higher education students who study in a college or in another setting have not been able to raise complaints to the OIA.

All students in higher education, including postgraduate degrees and some teacher training courses, will now be able to ask the OIA to investigate if they are unhappy with how their education provider has handled their complaint.

Our take: You pay your tuition fees to get a good education, so of course you should complain if you don’t feel you’re getting value to money. Higher education providers need your money and they should jump over hoops to give you the best education possible. We have a very helpful guide here to help you complain successfully.

Practical maths courses for students

dog maths A new maths course will be offered to sixth-form students, teaching them practical maths skills such as how to understand interest rates and mortgage repayments to help them in later life.

The ‘Core Maths’ qualification will be worth the same amount of points as an AS level and will be aimed at students who will need maths in other subjects such as geography but don’t love maths enough to study it at A Level. It will be up to individual schools and colleges to decide if they want to offer the course.

Our take: It’s a great idea as everybody does need maths in their lives – but by that we mean REAL maths and not different types of triangles. Students need a financial education so they leave school confident of managing problems, prepared for the real world and able to live within their means.

Free* Sky broadband for students

sky Heading back to uni soon? You need to start looking at broadband so you have some form of entertainment when you move in. Sky have an awesome deal which is perfect for students as it’s a 9 month contract, so you won’t pay for the months you’re not using it.

You can get Sky Unlimited broadband for free – just pay the line rental of £16.40 a month.

Our take: This deal is so cheap, especially when you consider that it’s only a 9 month contract. You can look at all broadband providers here to find the best deal for you.

Google replaces classic logo

google Oh, the end of a generation. Since 1999, Google’s logo has always been very recognisable with only a few minor tweaks. If you’ve used Google in the last few days (which most of you probably have) you’ll notice that the font has been changed to sans-serif and the colours have been toned down.

Apparently, the new logo is meant to reflect how people interact with Google products. Not sure exactly how a change of font conveys this.

Our take: It’s only a change of font – but it’s so different, I don’t like it! I simply can’t get over it. Am I the only one, or do you love it?

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